Haunted Spaces
ekomancer:

PENNSYLVANIA - GRUMBLETHORPE (Yes seriously, Grumblethorpe)
Grumblethorpe, in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the home of the Wister family. It was built as a summer residence in 1744 by Philadelphia merchant and wine importer John Wister. It eventually became the family’s year-round residence when they withdrew from the city during the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793.
The Wister family lived in the house for over 160 years. Diarist Sally Wister (John’s granddaughter) lived here from 1789 until her death in 1804. The house, which has been restored and refurnished to match the original period, now serves as a museum. The historic gardens are also being restored.
In September 1777, the house was the scene of events in the Battle of Germantown. While the Wisters were staying in another home, British General James Agnew occupied the house as his headquarters during the battle. He was wounded and died in the front parlor, where his blood stains can still be seen on the floor.
The General’s ethereal presence can be felt in the house, but his ghost is not the only one at Grumblethorpe. The other spirit is said to be that of a woman named Justinia. She was orphaned in the yellow fever epidemic and taken in by the Wisters. Justinia loved to bake bread, and baked bread every Friday night for distribution to the poor on Saturday morning. Justinia died in 1820, but her spirit has never left the house that was her home. Her spirit is most likely to be encountered on Friday evenings after sunset. Sometimes her presence is accompanied by the sweet smell of freshly baked bread.

ekomancer:

PENNSYLVANIA - GRUMBLETHORPE (Yes seriously, Grumblethorpe)

Grumblethorpe, in Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the home of the Wister family. It was built as a summer residence in 1744 by Philadelphia merchant and wine importer John Wister. It eventually became the family’s year-round residence when they withdrew from the city during the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793.

The Wister family lived in the house for over 160 years. Diarist Sally Wister (John’s granddaughter) lived here from 1789 until her death in 1804. The house, which has been restored and refurnished to match the original period, now serves as a museum. The historic gardens are also being restored.

In September 1777, the house was the scene of events in the Battle of Germantown. While the Wisters were staying in another home, British General James Agnew occupied the house as his headquarters during the battle. He was wounded and died in the front parlor, where his blood stains can still be seen on the floor.

The General’s ethereal presence can be felt in the house, but his ghost is not the only one at Grumblethorpe. The other spirit is said to be that of a woman named Justinia. She was orphaned in the yellow fever epidemic and taken in by the Wisters. Justinia loved to bake bread, and baked bread every Friday night for distribution to the poor on Saturday morning. Justinia died in 1820, but her spirit has never left the house that was her home. Her spirit is most likely to be encountered on Friday evenings after sunset. Sometimes her presence is accompanied by the sweet smell of freshly baked bread.

Reblogged from ekomancer

(via Ghostly World™ | Park: Dead Children’s Playground)


The Maple Hill Cemetery, founded in 1822, is Alabama’s oldest and largest cemetery. The Dead Children’s Playground is located within the cemetery limits, found in a cove surrounded by a rock cliff on three sides and paths through the woods.

The spirits of dead children from the cemetery are said to come play on the playground. Legend also has it that during the 1960s, Huntsville had a large amount of child abductions, and that the bodies of the children were found in the area surrounding the playground.

Activity includes swings moving on their own, the voices of children calling out, and the sound of giggling. Whenever visitors take photos, orbs of light appear mysteriously. Most of the paranormal occurrences happen between 10 PM and 3 AM…….more

(via Ghostly World™ | Park: Dead Children’s Playground)


The Maple Hill Cemetery, founded in 1822, is Alabama’s oldest and largest cemetery. The Dead Children’s Playground is located within the cemetery limits, found in a cove surrounded by a rock cliff on three sides and paths through the woods.

The spirits of dead children from the cemetery are said to come play on the playground. Legend also has it that during the 1960s, Huntsville had a large amount of child abductions, and that the bodies of the children were found in the area surrounding the playground.

Activity includes swings moving on their own, the voices of children calling out, and the sound of giggling. Whenever visitors take photos, orbs of light appear mysteriously. Most of the paranormal occurrences happen between 10 PM and 3 AM…….more


theparanormalguide:

Hanging Rock- Strange Places- A lot of people reading this article will have already heard of the location, due to it being one of Australia’s most famous films, here and abroad, ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’. The movie, which is based on a book of the same name, took this quaint setting and threw it into the spotlight for mystery lovers everywhere.Hanging Rock is in fact not the name of the mountain, but rather one of its many geographical features. It itself being a boulder, suspended by two other rocks under which the main walking path travels. Other features around the mount include ‘the Post Office’, a small hollow where passers by throw small rocks and ‘Lovers Leap’, a large rock looking out over a massive cliff face.Mt Diogenes was named by surveyor Robert Hoddle in 1844. Prior to this time, and colonial settlement, the mountain was used by the aboriginal tribes of the Kulin Nation. For more than 26,000 years it was a place for large tribal gatherings, trade, marriages and initiation ceremonies. It was an important landmark, as it sat on the border of four tribal territories.Unfortunately, as was the way things were, the local traditional owners were moved along from the site when colonisation took place. In 1844 the tribal initiation ceremonies largely stopped although, with only one other taking place in 1851. Although used as a location for gatherings, not one of the tribes would climb into the mountain, as they believed harmful spirits lived among the rocks and crevices.An interesting fact is that the rock that makes up the mountain (created over six million years ago by magma exiting a vent), can only be found in two or three other places around the world. This rarity, along with the places natural beauty, saw it become a great tourist attraction.In 1861 the railway was opened in nearby Woodend, and hotels sprang up along the roads. In the mid 1860’s, Mr W. Adams built the ‘Hanging Rock Hotel’, and spent a lot of money developing the area, including importing swans, ornamental trees, establishing garden beds and eventually building a horse racing track on the Western side of the rock.It was also during this period that many a bushranger sought shelter among the features of Mt Diogenes. The natural nooks and crannies formed the perfect hiding place for those on the run from the law, as the mount afforded a good and clear lookout over the surrounding country side.It was in 1901 that Hanging Rock, as the mountain had become commonly known, saw its first tragedy. On new years day James Flight, along with his wife and two children, visited the rock, and after some time, James decided he would climb it.He took his two children, but after a while when the climb became difficult, James sent his children back. Later that day, James was seen staggering along the rock by some other visitors, who laid him down and called for the police and a doctor. By the time the doctor had arrived, James was dead. Although the following inquest found that the death was accidental, no one was convinced or satisfied that a fall had caused all of his injuries.With such beauty in the landscape, the mysteriousness of the features and the stories of spirits amongst the rock, it is little wander that in 1967, Joan Lindsay wrote her famous piece of mysterious Australiana, ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’.The story centres on the 1900 Valentines Day visit of a group of girls from Appleyard College to Hanging Rock for a picnic. The main theme tackles the disappearance of three of the girls, and one of their teachers, while climbing the rock. In the story, the mystery is never solved.About ten years later the book was adapted to the screen, and the mystery gathered a great deal more attention. Was it a true story?Although many people did in fact believe Picnic at Hanging Rock was based on real events, it is all pure fiction. Joan Lindsay did such a convincing job of writing the book as a ‘false document’, that many people were convinced that it was fact. None of the girls existed, the school never existed (Martindale Hall in South Australia was used as the location of Appleyard Hall in the movie… Martindale itself is an interesting story…) and even the day and holiday the events took place are wrong.It is still a fantastic story, and one that will haunt your mind as you try to work out what, in fact, happened to the girls and their teacher.For those who are really intrigued by the tale, you can try to locate a copy of ‘The Secret of Hanging Rock’, which is the unpublished final chapter of the book. Originally Joan Lindsay had included what had happened to the girls, but the publishers wanted to retain an air of mystery to the book, so had it removed prior to publication. This final chapter was released in 1987, three years after Joan Lindsay’s, death in accordance to her wishes.Had the final chapter been in the book, and thus in the movie, Peter Weir, the movies director, would have been saved from seeing a cup of coffee thrown at the screen during an early screening. According to Weir, “One distributor threw his coffee cup at the screen at the end of it, because he’d wasted two hours of his life—a mystery without a goddamn solution!”Ashley Hall 2013.Photo: The Hanging RockInset Upper: Mt Diogenes taken about 1900Inset middle: A still from the movie showing the girls venturing deep into the formation.Inset Lower: Martindale Hall, South Australia. The setting for Appleyard College.
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theparanormalguide:

Hanging Rock
- Strange Places

- A lot of people reading this article will have already heard of the location, due to it being one of Australia’s most famous films, here and abroad, ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’. The movie, which is based on a book of the same name, took this quaint setting and threw it into the spotlight for mystery lovers everywhere.

Hanging Rock is in fact not the name of the mountain, but rather one of its many geographical features. It itself being a boulder, suspended by two other rocks under which the main walking path travels. Other features around the mount include ‘the Post Office’, a small hollow where passers by throw small rocks and ‘Lovers Leap’, a large rock looking out over a massive cliff face.

Mt Diogenes was named by surveyor Robert Hoddle in 1844. Prior to this time, and colonial settlement, the mountain was used by the aboriginal tribes of the Kulin Nation. For more than 26,000 years it was a place for large tribal gatherings, trade, marriages and initiation ceremonies. It was an important landmark, as it sat on the border of four tribal territories.

Unfortunately, as was the way things were, the local traditional owners were moved along from the site when colonisation took place. In 1844 the tribal initiation ceremonies largely stopped although, with only one other taking place in 1851. Although used as a location for gatherings, not one of the tribes would climb into the mountain, as they believed harmful spirits lived among the rocks and crevices.

An interesting fact is that the rock that makes up the mountain (created over six million years ago by magma exiting a vent), can only be found in two or three other places around the world. This rarity, along with the places natural beauty, saw it become a great tourist attraction.

In 1861 the railway was opened in nearby Woodend, and hotels sprang up along the roads. In the mid 1860’s, Mr W. Adams built the ‘Hanging Rock Hotel’, and spent a lot of money developing the area, including importing swans, ornamental trees, establishing garden beds and eventually building a horse racing track on the Western side of the rock.

It was also during this period that many a bushranger sought shelter among the features of Mt Diogenes. The natural nooks and crannies formed the perfect hiding place for those on the run from the law, as the mount afforded a good and clear lookout over the surrounding country side.

It was in 1901 that Hanging Rock, as the mountain had become commonly known, saw its first tragedy. On new years day James Flight, along with his wife and two children, visited the rock, and after some time, James decided he would climb it.

He took his two children, but after a while when the climb became difficult, James sent his children back. Later that day, James was seen staggering along the rock by some other visitors, who laid him down and called for the police and a doctor. By the time the doctor had arrived, James was dead. Although the following inquest found that the death was accidental, no one was convinced or satisfied that a fall had caused all of his injuries.

With such beauty in the landscape, the mysteriousness of the features and the stories of spirits amongst the rock, it is little wander that in 1967, Joan Lindsay wrote her famous piece of mysterious Australiana, ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’.

The story centres on the 1900 Valentines Day visit of a group of girls from Appleyard College to Hanging Rock for a picnic. The main theme tackles the disappearance of three of the girls, and one of their teachers, while climbing the rock. In the story, the mystery is never solved.

About ten years later the book was adapted to the screen, and the mystery gathered a great deal more attention. Was it a true story?

Although many people did in fact believe Picnic at Hanging Rock was based on real events, it is all pure fiction. Joan Lindsay did such a convincing job of writing the book as a ‘false document’, that many people were convinced that it was fact. None of the girls existed, the school never existed (Martindale Hall in South Australia was used as the location of Appleyard Hall in the movie… Martindale itself is an interesting story…) and even the day and holiday the events took place are wrong.

It is still a fantastic story, and one that will haunt your mind as you try to work out what, in fact, happened to the girls and their teacher.

For those who are really intrigued by the tale, you can try to locate a copy of ‘The Secret of Hanging Rock’, which is the unpublished final chapter of the book. Originally Joan Lindsay had included what had happened to the girls, but the publishers wanted to retain an air of mystery to the book, so had it removed prior to publication. This final chapter was released in 1987, three years after Joan Lindsay’s, death in accordance to her wishes.

Had the final chapter been in the book, and thus in the movie, Peter Weir, the movies director, would have been saved from seeing a cup of coffee thrown at the screen during an early screening. According to Weir, “One distributor threw his coffee cup at the screen at the end of it, because he’d wasted two hours of his life—a mystery without a goddamn solution!”


Ashley Hall 2013.

Photo: The Hanging Rock
Inset Upper: Mt Diogenes taken about 1900
Inset middle: A still from the movie showing the girls venturing deep into the formation.
Inset Lower: Martindale Hall, South Australia. The setting for Appleyard College.

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. Website. Youtube. Twitter. Facebook. Google+. Newsletter.

Reblogged from theparanormalguide

The Devil’s Footprint-Manchester, Maine



The North Manchester Meeting House was built in 1793 and still serves as a church, complete with the abovementioned cemetery. The “fossilized footprint” of the devil can be found in a rock on the corner of the wall right beside the meeting house, with the impressions facing the meeting house.

The legend: When workers were building a road through the township they came upon a large stone that could not be lifted or moved by any conventional means at the time. Frustrated at the situation one of the works was said to have called out “I would give my soul to the Devil to move this rock” upon returning to the site on the following day the rock was indeed no longer where it had been it was now fully cleared from the path of the new road. The worker who had made his statement the previous day however was nowhere to be found and they say never heard from again. 

The Devil’s Footprint-Manchester, Maine

The North Manchester Meeting House was built in 1793 and still serves as a church, complete with the abovementioned cemetery. The “fossilized footprint” of the devil can be found in a rock on the corner of the wall right beside the meeting house, with the impressions facing the meeting house.

The legend: When workers were building a road through the township they came upon a large stone that could not be lifted or moved by any conventional means at the time. Frustrated at the situation one of the works was said to have called out “I would give my soul to the Devil to move this rock” upon returning to the site on the following day the rock was indeed no longer where it had been it was now fully cleared from the path of the new road. The worker who had made his statement the previous day however was nowhere to be found and they say never heard from again. 


thecadaverousportrait:

Originally known as Mayday Hills Lunatic Asylum, Beechworth was a sister hospital to Ararat in Victoria, Australia, and was open for 128 years before shutting its doors for good in 1995. Both Beechworth and Ararat were opened in the same year after Victoria’s lone mental institution suffered became overcrowded. At its height, Beechworth housed roughly 1,200 patients, and it was remarkably easy to have someone committed, requiring only two signatures to do so.
There were reports of mysterious deaths and disappearances at Beechworth, and in the facility’s first laboratory for experimentation, operations and autopsies, jars filled with body parts adorned the shelves throughout the room. These jars have since vanished, as a fire took part of Beechworth in the 1950’s and the jars disappeared sometime around the restoration of the facility. Of course, when you consider that Beechworth’s first superintendent believed the moon caused insanity and therefore would never go out at night without an umbrella, some of these practices begin to make a big more sense. Overall, nearly 9,000 patients died at Beechworth, including a young girl who was mysteriously thrown from a window, her death going unsolved. Ghosts and murder tours are still offered at the facility.

thecadaverousportrait:

Originally known as Mayday Hills Lunatic Asylum, Beechworth was a sister hospital to Ararat in Victoria, Australia, and was open for 128 years before shutting its doors for good in 1995. Both Beechworth and Ararat were opened in the same year after Victoria’s lone mental institution suffered became overcrowded. At its height, Beechworth housed roughly 1,200 patients, and it was remarkably easy to have someone committed, requiring only two signatures to do so.

There were reports of mysterious deaths and disappearances at Beechworth, and in the facility’s first laboratory for experimentation, operations and autopsies, jars filled with body parts adorned the shelves throughout the room. These jars have since vanished, as a fire took part of Beechworth in the 1950’s and the jars disappeared sometime around the restoration of the facility. Of course, when you consider that Beechworth’s first superintendent believed the moon caused insanity and therefore would never go out at night without an umbrella, some of these practices begin to make a big more sense. Overall, nearly 9,000 patients died at Beechworth, including a young girl who was mysteriously thrown from a window, her death going unsolved. Ghosts and murder tours are still offered at the facility.

Reblogged from thecadaverousportrait

theparanormalblog:

Bigfoot Caught on Tape Walking Through the Forest?

Don’t you just hate it when you’re filming a Bald Eagle during a rainstorm and then Bigfoot has to show up to steal all the attention? Let someone else shine for once, Bigfoot! Seriously, the nerve it has, especially the one in this video, which was shot on an unknown date at an unknown location. The short clip, recorded by a woman with an unspecified name, shows a Bald Eagle in what appears to be some kind of sanctuary or enclosure during a rainstorm. Suddenly, the woman’s attention is drawn towards a Bigfoot-looking creature walking through the forest. The creature is only seen for a few seconds, and the video ends there.

You know, it’s not the Bigfoot that I find odd, it’s the set-up to this video. My biggest question isn’t ‘is that Bigfoot real?’, it’s ‘why is this woman filming a Bald Eagle in the rain?’. I could understand why she’d be filming it if it weren’t raining, but during a storm seems a bit odd. Now, I only say it’s odd because I assume that this Bald Eagle is in an enclosure. If it’s not and it was a free animal that she stumbled upon, then I can see why she’d want to film it. But then that raises the question of what is she doing out in the rain in the forest? Was this outside her work place? Her home? This is just one of those cases where if you try to explain one thing, five new questions/scenarios appear and it seemingly becomes impossible to legitimately answer/explain them all. As for the Bigfoot, I’m not convinced it’s real. Just after the woman says “what the hell”, you can hear a sound, presumably coming from the Bigfoot. However, it sounds like a person that’s trying to imitate Bigfoot noises. I will say that it certainly looks like it could be a real Bigfoot, but everything else about this clip is making me think otherwise. Overall, I don’t think this video is real, but what do you think? Did this woman really spot a Bigfoot during a rainstorm, or is this just another hoax?

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Reblogged from theparanormalblog

theparanormalguide:

Leonarda Cianciulli – The Soap Maker- Serial Killers- On October 15, 1970 convicted serial killer Leonarda Cianciulli died from a brain haemorrhage in a women’s asylum for the criminally insane. She had spent the previous two decades incarcerated for the murder of two women, murders she did not regret, murders even she felt were necessary, for the survival of her children.Leonarda Cianciulli believed there was a curse on her family, and the sacrifice of three women were needed to lift it.Cianciulli was born in the small town of Montella in 1894. She was an unhappy child, who attempted suicide on more than one occasion. Her marriage was to be arranged, and she did not like the prospect of marrying someone she was certain not to be in love with.In 1917, she went against her parents’ wishes and married Raffaele Pansardi, a registry Clerk. The couple moved to Pansardi’s hometown in 1921, and it was at this time Cianciulli believed that her mother cursed her.She was very worried about this curse, and being quite a spiritual person, Cianciulli sought out the advice and readings of a fortune teller and a palm reader.The Fortune Teller told her that her children would all suffer from many troubles, and although she would have many, all would perish early.The Palm Reader told her she saw both a prison and an asylum, somewhere in her future.Both of these readings turned out to be quite accurate.While in her husband’s hometown of Lauria, Cianciulli did some short time in prison for fraud. With the shame of the time looming over her head, she and her husband moved to another town, only to have their new home destroyed in an earthquake. After this piece of bad luck they moved once more, and finally settled in Correggio, another small town.Here Cianciulli set up a small shop, and at times would read other peoples fortunes. It was a happy life until tragedy struck her and her family again and again, as the first of her ‘misfortunes’ came true.Out of seventeen pregnancies Cianciulli was only able to raise four children out of infancy. Ten of her children died in their young years, and another three were miscarried. She became very protective of her remaining children, and when word came that her favourite son had joined the Italian army to fight in World War Two, she knew she had to do something, lest he be lost to her as well.Cianciulli figured that the only way to lift the curse her mother had placed on to her was to perform human sacrifice. Three murders were planned and were carried out as follows.Faustina Setti had been seeking Cianciulli’s fortune telling, as a means of helping to find herself a husband. On her final sitting, Faustina was told that her husband was waiting in another town, and that she must travel or she would be fated to never meet him. She was told not to tell anyone where she was going, and to write postcards for her family and friends to tell them where she had gone when she got there.Setti made her plans, and on the day of departure went to visit Cianciulli one last time. She had with her postcards written to her family as directed by Cianciulli, to help her with her future.With everything in place and ready for departure, Setti was offered a parting drink of wine. However, when she drank the wine Setti fell unconscious, and Cianciulli took to her with an axe, killing her. Cianculli then set to dismembering the corpse over a basin in a closet. In her words:"I threw the pieces into a pot, added seven kilos of caustic soda, which I had bought to make soap, and stirred the whole mixture until the pieces dissolved in a thick, dark mush that I poured into several buckets and emptied in a nearby septic tank.As for the blood in the basin, I waited until it had coagulated, dried it in the oven, ground it and mixed it with flour, sugar, chocolate, milk and eggs, as well as a bit of margarine, kneading all the ingredients together. I made lots of crunchy tea cakes and served them to the ladies who came to visit, though Giuseppe and I also ate them.”(-stated by Cianciulli at her trial)The second victim was Francesca Soavi, who was looking for work. Cianciulli ‘saw’ that a suitable job awaited her in the town of Piacenza. Once again postcards to friends and family were written in advance, and the murder, soap making and biscuit baking with the body took place.Four weeks later a third woman, Virginia Cacioppo fell victim. She too had work found for her in another town, and once again the murder took place exactly as the first two had.This time Cianciulli added that Cacioppo made for a really creamy soap, and that the biscuits cooked from her remains were especially sweet and that everyone thoroughly enjoyed them!Cianciulli’s plot was finally undone several years later, when Cacioppo’s sister reported her missing and police arrived at Cianciulli’s house, as it was the last place Cacioppo had been seen. Cianciulli did not even attempt to hide what she had done and admitted everything to police.During the subsequent trial, Cianciulli spoke quite frankly about everything she had done, and even corrected the prosecutors on details of her crime, going so far as to tell where some of the evidence had gone:"I gave the copper ladle, which I used to skim the fat off the kettles, to my country, which was so badly in need of metal during the last days of the war…. "For the three murders Cianciulli was sentenced to thirty years prison, and three years in an asylum for the criminally insane.The second of her ‘misfortunes’ had also come to pass…
Ashley Hall 2013.Photo: Leonarda Cianciulli after her arrest.Inset Upper: The victims – Virginia Cacioppo, Faustina Setti and Clementina Saovi.Inset Middle: The kitchen and pot where the deeds took place.Inset Lower: The instruments of death.
You can also follow The Paranormal Guide at:Tumblr. Website. Youtube. Twitter. Facebook. Google+. Newsletter.

theparanormalguide:

Leonarda Cianciulli – The Soap Maker
- Serial Killers

- On October 15, 1970 convicted serial killer Leonarda Cianciulli died from a brain haemorrhage in a women’s asylum for the criminally insane. She had spent the previous two decades incarcerated for the murder of two women, murders she did not regret, murders even she felt were necessary, for the survival of her children.

Leonarda Cianciulli believed there was a curse on her family, and the sacrifice of three women were needed to lift it.

Cianciulli was born in the small town of Montella in 1894. She was an unhappy child, who attempted suicide on more than one occasion. Her marriage was to be arranged, and she did not like the prospect of marrying someone she was certain not to be in love with.

In 1917, she went against her parents’ wishes and married Raffaele Pansardi, a registry Clerk. The couple moved to Pansardi’s hometown in 1921, and it was at this time Cianciulli believed that her mother cursed her.

She was very worried about this curse, and being quite a spiritual person, Cianciulli sought out the advice and readings of a fortune teller and a palm reader.

The Fortune Teller told her that her children would all suffer from many troubles, and although she would have many, all would perish early.

The Palm Reader told her she saw both a prison and an asylum, somewhere in her future.

Both of these readings turned out to be quite accurate.

While in her husband’s hometown of Lauria, Cianciulli did some short time in prison for fraud. With the shame of the time looming over her head, she and her husband moved to another town, only to have their new home destroyed in an earthquake. After this piece of bad luck they moved once more, and finally settled in Correggio, another small town.

Here Cianciulli set up a small shop, and at times would read other peoples fortunes. It was a happy life until tragedy struck her and her family again and again, as the first of her ‘misfortunes’ came true.

Out of seventeen pregnancies Cianciulli was only able to raise four children out of infancy. Ten of her children died in their young years, and another three were miscarried. She became very protective of her remaining children, and when word came that her favourite son had joined the Italian army to fight in World War Two, she knew she had to do something, lest he be lost to her as well.

Cianciulli figured that the only way to lift the curse her mother had placed on to her was to perform human sacrifice. Three murders were planned and were carried out as follows.

Faustina Setti had been seeking Cianciulli’s fortune telling, as a means of helping to find herself a husband. On her final sitting, Faustina was told that her husband was waiting in another town, and that she must travel or she would be fated to never meet him. She was told not to tell anyone where she was going, and to write postcards for her family and friends to tell them where she had gone when she got there.

Setti made her plans, and on the day of departure went to visit Cianciulli one last time. She had with her postcards written to her family as directed by Cianciulli, to help her with her future.

With everything in place and ready for departure, Setti was offered a parting drink of wine. However, when she drank the wine Setti fell unconscious, and Cianciulli took to her with an axe, killing her. Cianculli then set to dismembering the corpse over a basin in a closet. In her words:

"I threw the pieces into a pot, added seven kilos of caustic soda, which I had bought to make soap, and stirred the whole mixture until the pieces dissolved in a thick, dark mush that I poured into several buckets and emptied in a nearby septic tank.

As for the blood in the basin, I waited until it had coagulated, dried it in the oven, ground it and mixed it with flour, sugar, chocolate, milk and eggs, as well as a bit of margarine, kneading all the ingredients together. I made lots of crunchy tea cakes and served them to the ladies who came to visit, though Giuseppe and I also ate them.”
(-stated by Cianciulli at her trial)

The second victim was Francesca Soavi, who was looking for work. Cianciulli ‘saw’ that a suitable job awaited her in the town of Piacenza. Once again postcards to friends and family were written in advance, and the murder, soap making and biscuit baking with the body took place.

Four weeks later a third woman, Virginia Cacioppo fell victim. She too had work found for her in another town, and once again the murder took place exactly as the first two had.

This time Cianciulli added that Cacioppo made for a really creamy soap, and that the biscuits cooked from her remains were especially sweet and that everyone thoroughly enjoyed them!

Cianciulli’s plot was finally undone several years later, when Cacioppo’s sister reported her missing and police arrived at Cianciulli’s house, as it was the last place Cacioppo had been seen. Cianciulli did not even attempt to hide what she had done and admitted everything to police.

During the subsequent trial, Cianciulli spoke quite frankly about everything she had done, and even corrected the prosecutors on details of her crime, going so far as to tell where some of the evidence had gone:

"I gave the copper ladle, which I used to skim the fat off the kettles, to my country, which was so badly in need of metal during the last days of the war…. "

For the three murders Cianciulli was sentenced to thirty years prison, and three years in an asylum for the criminally insane.

The second of her ‘misfortunes’ had also come to pass…


Ashley Hall 2013.

Photo: Leonarda Cianciulli after her arrest.
Inset Upper: The victims – Virginia Cacioppo, Faustina Setti and Clementina Saovi.
Inset Middle: The kitchen and pot where the deeds took place.
Inset Lower: The instruments of death.

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. Website. Youtube. Twitter. Facebook. Google+. Newsletter.

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(via 10 Terrifyingly Creepy Abandoned Hotels | Paranormal)


Bokor Hill Station was a Cambodian resort town built in the early 1920s by colonial French settlers, the crown jewel of which was the beautiful Bokor Palace Hotel and Casino. Construction in the remote mountains was difficult and around 1,000 lives were lost in the process.
The area flourished for two decades as an oasis in the squalid heat and clutter of Phnom Penh, but Europeans fled the area in the late 1940s when the Vietnam conflict ramped up. Bokor Palace was used intermittently over the years, but constant military and political instability—including invasions by Vietnam and mass killings by the Khmer Rouge—ensured the area was all but abandoned by the early ’90s.

Bokor Hill Station is now a popular tourist attraction, sitting on national park land. Although not even 100 years old, the hotel looks like a moss-cloaked ancient ruin. According to locals, the Palace teems with the spirits of those who gave their lives to build it. A park ranger named Vichat explained that he wouldn’t enter the building at night, saying “Every time we walk past, we can hear the dead walk in there. It’s full of ghosts.” Several movies have capitalized on the hotel’s creepy atmosphere, including Korean horror film R-Point and Matt Dillon’s forgettable crime drama City of Ghosts.

(via 10 Terrifyingly Creepy Abandoned Hotels | Paranormal)


Bokor Hill Station was a Cambodian resort town built in the early 1920s by colonial French settlers, the crown jewel of which was the beautiful Bokor Palace Hotel and Casino. Construction in the remote mountains was difficult and around 1,000 lives were lost in the process.
The area flourished for two decades as an oasis in the squalid heat and clutter of Phnom Penh, but Europeans fled the area in the late 1940s when the Vietnam conflict ramped up. Bokor Palace was used intermittently over the years, but constant military and political instability—including invasions by Vietnam and mass killings by the Khmer Rouge—ensured the area was all but abandoned by the early ’90s.

Bokor Hill Station is now a popular tourist attraction, sitting on national park land. Although not even 100 years old, the hotel looks like a moss-cloaked ancient ruin. According to locals, the Palace teems with the spirits of those who gave their lives to build it. A park ranger named Vichat explained that he wouldn’t enter the building at night, saying “Every time we walk past, we can hear the dead walk in there. It’s full of ghosts.” Several movies have capitalized on the hotel’s creepy atmosphere, including Korean horror film R-Point and Matt Dillon’s forgettable crime drama City of Ghosts.


nosleepparanormal:

In the 1730s, German immigrants in Fredrick County, Maryland claimed to have encountered a terrifying creature. Shortly after founding their town, the residents began reporting sightings of a beast that was half-bird, half-reptile, with a beak made of metal with razor-sharp teeth. It also sported tentacles like an octopus that it used to seize people and carry them away, presumably to feed to its bird-lizard-robot-squid babies. When you first hear this story, not to mention the creature’s moniker of “the Snallygaster,” it is easy to scoff. But the plot thickened a bit for residents when sightings of these creatures were reported everywhere from New Jersey to Ohio. Of course, “sightings reported” and “hard evidence” are worlds apart, but we aren’t going to nitpick.

nosleepparanormal:

In the 1730s, German immigrants in Fredrick County, Maryland claimed to have encountered a terrifying creature. Shortly after founding their town, the residents began reporting sightings of a beast that was half-bird, half-reptile, with a beak made of metal with razor-sharp teeth. It also sported tentacles like an octopus that it used to seize people and carry them away, presumably to feed to its bird-lizard-robot-squid babies. When you first hear this story, not to mention the creature’s moniker of “the Snallygaster,” it is easy to scoff. But the plot thickened a bit for residents when sightings of these creatures were reported everywhere from New Jersey to Ohio. Of course, “sightings reported” and “hard evidence” are worlds apart, but we aren’t going to nitpick.

Reblogged from nosleepparanormal

theparanormalblog:

Strange “Living Hairball” Creature Caught on Tape in Russia?

How is it that someone tests a camera that records video with horrendous picture quality, like the video above, and goes ‘perfect! this is acceptable, go put it on the shelves!’? I almost don’t believe these types of cameras exist simply because I’ve never actually owned a camera this horrible. Even my old camcorder that uses cassette tapes records better looking videos than this! I think even a flip-phone video looks better than this. But regardless, let’s do our best to try and figure out what it is we’re looking at in this clip, which comes to us from Russia and was shot on an unspecified date. The original video (which might have been taken down) was uploaded by a woman named Tatiana Zemlyanskaya. The video shows some friends in the woods when they come across a large hairball. They all gather near it and one throw a stick at it, causing it to move. The video then cuts to a shot of the ‘living hairball’ running away as the friends chase after it. Then the video ends.

This is probably the first group of people who didn’t run away screaming once they saw some mysterious creature. However, I’m questioning if this is even a real creature. First off, we aren’t even sure what this thing is suppose to be. The original video was apparently labeled as “Bigfoot”, but this looks nothing like a Bigfoot, especially when it’s running at the end of the video. Of all the animals, it looks like it could be either a Yak or a Bear. I was thinking that it’s a person underneath a bunch of fur blankets and is moving it around to make it looks like it’s alive. But, I don’t think there’s any way of officially knowing what this is because the picture quality is so bad. Overall, while I can’t decide what exactly this is, I’m almost positive that this isn’t a Bigfoot or some other type of undiscovered creature. But what do you think? Did this group of friends really capture a mysterious hairball creature/possible Bigfoot on tape, is it a known animal or is this just someone underneath a large pile of fur blankets?

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Reblogged from theparanormalblog